Monday, January 24, 2011

Kushavart Kund - Trimbakeshwar

After visiting the Trimbakeshwar Temple, we headed towards a water tank revered as a sacred bathing place, the Kushavart kund.

The sacred pilgrimage known as Kushavart in Trimbakeshwar
[ The sacred pilgrimage known as Kushavart in Trimbakeshwar ]

There is an interesting account explaining the significance of the place. Sage Gautam once committed a sin of killing a cow. As an act of repentance, He performed penance at the peaks of the Brahmagiri Mountains, appeased Lord Shiva and asked for the Ganga waters so that he could wipe off his sin. Pleased with his devotion, Lord Shiva jerked His big locks of matted hairs on the Brahmagiri Mountains and sent Ganga down onto the earth. Today that place is known as Gangadwar, situated half way to the Brahmagiri Mountains. There is a temple of Ganga, now known as Godavari River. Ganga appears first time here, after which it vanishes.

But the flow of the Ganges was tremendous due to which the sage could not bathe in her waters. He then surrounded the river with Kusha, a type of grass and put a stop to her flow.  After bathing here his sin of killing a cow was finally wiped off. The tirth (pilgrimage) came to be known as Kushavart.

Thus today, Kushavart is known as the symbolic origin of the River Godavari. It is from this Kushavart that the river Godavari flows up to the sea. There are temples at the four corners of Kushavart.

People at the Kushavart kund
[ People at the Kushavart kund ]

Temples besides the Kushavart kund
[ Temples besides the Kushavart kund ]

A Shiv Ling on the banks of the Kushavart kund
[ A Shiv Ling on the banks of the Kushavart kund ]


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25 comments:

  1. An interesting story, and very good pictures! Why is that square fence inside the water?

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  2. interesting post. i like the last pic. i like how you describe the history and legends of places. thanks
    ~laura x

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  3. Beautiful pictures. The 1st and last pics are really beautiful.

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  4. @ Ginny
    As a precautionary measure since the water is deep in the middle.

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  5. Fascinating, thank you for sharing this.

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  6. Lovely story this! Love it, how india is so full of these myths and storoes and spirituality is deeply woven into everything. Preyy pictuers too. Have a happy tuesday!

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  7. history is amazing... pictures r good... the temple looks very old in its structure... it gives a rustic look...

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  8. Wonderful post. Thanks.

    All the best, Boonie

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  9. I was going to ask the same question about the fence. It didn't look as though it is deep. How deep is it?

    very interesting post Arti! thank you for educating and entertaining

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  10. @ Green Monkey
    I do not know the exact depth but its quite deep for sure...
    It is just for precautionary measure..

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  11. Enjoyed reading this post and lovely pictures, Arti. I loved the last click, simply divine :-)

    Congratulations! I have voted for you :-)

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  12. Thanks for information on another interesting place. Thank God the current day politicians does not pray and appease the God for getting water to wash of their sins. Had they done it the whole of India will be completely under water ;)

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  13. Hey Arti, thank you for visiting! Hope you have a splenddi weekend, whereever you are - with time for a gorgeous breakfast ;)

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  14. What a fascinating story! And that water is such a lovely, and unusual, colour.

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  15. Nice pics ....I just loved this. Aarti your blog is very different and your efforts are really wonderful....my dear friend!

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  16. After looking at the pics i remembered i took a dip or sip Lolz good coverage of the spot Arti

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  17. interesting story...beautiful pictures...you travel a lot, do you?

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  18. nice pictures :D and a very interesting story to go with it :)

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  19. Interesting history behind the temple. Wonderful shots.

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  20. Loved 'visiting' this place...nice story behind it. WOnderful temple...Great post, Arti:)

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  21. I am learning about this kund for the first time. I had been to Trimbakeshwar but only visited the Jyotirling that too after a wait of around 3 hours. It was very much crowded that particular day. Thank you for this beautiful info.

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  22. Thank you for allowing me to use your text for my post at Flickr Stay Blessed

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/firozeshakir/20843118490/in/dateposted/

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    Replies
    1. I am so happy to see my little diary featured in your poetic stream... this kind gesture of yours is a beautiful blessing for me, thank you.

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